At the Art Show

by aengelson | May 15th, 2010

Kid astronauts!

On a lighter note, after that grim philosophical post yesterday: Matilda showed us her school art show at System’s Little House in Hanoi. And it was fantastic! Among the attractions was a cool Space Room filled with astronaut figures, a diorama of the planets and stars, a collection of Martian clay figures, and a soundtrack of a countdown and blastoff.

Elsewhere, there were plenty of other drawings, paintings, and activities. And Matilda really got into the fundraiser: selling cookies to raise money for the Moon Bear Rescue Centre in Tam Dao. She sold a lot of cookies, and got a big bear hug from her teacher for all her hard work. Nice job!

Matilda's "camouflage" portrait

Also on display was a fantastic series of “camouflage” portraits the kids did by painting their faces, having photos taken, and then then adding colors and found object to the photos to make a collage. As a completely unbiased art critic, I can say with authority that they were incredible! Way to go, junior artists! (Click on either photo to view a Flickr gallery of photos from the art show).

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About This Site

Andy Engelson is a writer and editor who lives in Hanoi, Vietnam. He's currently working on a historical novel set in the Northwest United States during World War II. He's also a freelance writer, essayist and member of the Hanoi Writer's Collective. In a former life, he edited Washington Trails magazine for six years and before that was freelance journalist. He likes to hike, travel, and play with his family.

Quotable

I heartily accept the motto,“That government is best which governs least”; and I should like to see it acted up to more rapidly and systematically. Carried out, it finally amounts to this, which also I believe,“That government is best which governs not at all”; and when men are prepared for it, that will be the kind of government which they will have. Government is at best but an expedient; but most governments are usually, and all governments are sometimes, inexpedient. The objections which have been brought against a standing army, and they are many and weighty, and deserve to prevail, may also at last be brought against a standing government. The standing army is only an arm of the standing government. The government itself, which is only the mode which the people have chosen to execute their will, is equally liable to be abused and perverted before the people can act through it. Witness the present Mexican war, the work of comparatively a few individuals using the standing government as their tool; for, in the outset, the people would not have consented to this measure. . . .
But, to speak practically and as a citizen, unlike those who call themselves no-government men, I ask for, not at once no government, but at once a better government. Let every man make known what kind of government would command his respect, and that will be one step toward obtaining it.
— Henry David Thoreau, “Civil Disobedience”

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