Two Hanoi Skyscrapers Catch Fire

by aengelson | December 15th, 2011

Riding home today, I saw a huge black cloud, and then when I turned onto the road past Truc Bach Lake, I saw this…

Two Hanoi skyscrapers that were under construction caught fire today.

Fortunately the two towers are still under construction, but I worried for the workers who might have been trapped stunning teen porn movies blog inside. The story is here: thankfully, no one was killed, although 15 were injured, and about 30 people had to be rescued. Work site safety is just not a priority in this country–they were incredibly lucky this wasn’t worse.

Creepy to see awesome australian dating site a couple of towers on fire. Not an image I’d care to see again.

 

 

One Response to “Two Hanoi Skyscrapers Catch Fire”

  1. Rachel Cunningham says:

    Great shot — Andy. Thanks for sharing.

Leave a Reply

About This milf porn Site

Hi, I'm Andy Engelson, a writer and editor who lived in awesome asian porn Hanoi for five years and now lives in Geneva Switzerland. This blog is no longer active, but you can find more of my writing at The Lost Salt Atlas. I'm currently working on a historical novel set in the Northwest United States during World War II. In a former life, I source edited Washington Trails magazine. I like to hike, travel, and play with my family.

Quotable

But a gift makes a connection. To take the simplest of examples, the French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss tells of a seemingly trivial ceremony he has often seen accompany a meal in cheap restaurants in the South of France. The patrons sit at a long, communal table, and each finds before his plate a modest bottle of wine. Before the meal begins, a man will pour his wine not into his own glass but into his neighbor’s. And his neighbor will return the gesture, filling the first man’s empty glass. In an economic sense nothing has happened. No one has any more wine than he did to begin with. But society has appeared where there was none before. The French customarily tend to ignore people whom they do not know, but in these little restaurants, strangers find themselves placed in close relationship for an hour or more. “A conflict exists, says Lévi-Strauss, “not very keen to be sure, but real enough and sufficient to create a state of tension between the norm of privacy and the fact of community. . . . This is the fleeting but difficult situation resolved by the exchange of wine. It is an assertion of good grace which does away with the mutual uncertainty.” Spacial proximity becomes social life through an exchange of gifts. Further, the pouring of the wine sanctions another exchange—conversation—and a whole series of trivial social ties unfolds. — Lewis Hyde, The Gift

Blogroll

Recent Posts

Previous Posts

Most Recent Comments