Going For a Ride

by aengelson | August 19th, 2010

I’m too lazy and busy to post a long, detailed blog entry, so I’ll just show you a couple pictures that illustrate why I love Hanoi.

Goldfish go for a motorbike ride.

2 Responses to “Going For a Ride”

  1. Great reminder of my time in Hanoi. I actually took several photos of amazing sights on motorbikes. Chickens in crates was my favorite but the goldfish are up there. Seeing 5 people on one bike was pretty high on my list of best shots too.
    Love your blog

  2. that is right up there with the guy in Amsterdam we saw, who was riding his bike while balancing a brand-new-in-box stereo system on his handlebars.

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About This Site

Andy Engelson is a writer and editor who lives in Hanoi, Vietnam. He's currently working on a historical novel set in the Northwest United States during World War II. He's also a freelance writer, essayist and member of the Hanoi Writer's Collective. In a former life, he edited Washington Trails magazine for six years and before that was freelance journalist. He likes to hike, travel, and play with his family.

Quotable

But a gift makes a connection. To take the simplest of examples, the French anthropologist Claude Lévi-Strauss tells of a seemingly trivial ceremony he has often seen accompany a meal in cheap restaurants in the South of France. The patrons sit at a long, communal table, and each finds before his plate a modest bottle of wine. Before the meal begins, a man will pour his wine not into his own glass but into his neighbor’s. And his neighbor will return the gesture, filling the first man’s empty glass. In an economic sense nothing has happened. No one has any more wine than he did to begin with. But society has appeared where there was none before. The French customarily tend to ignore people whom they do not know, but in these little restaurants, strangers find themselves placed in close relationship for an hour or more. “A conflict exists, says Lévi-Strauss, “not very keen to be sure, but real enough and sufficient to create a state of tension between the norm of privacy and the fact of community. . . . This is the fleeting but difficult situation resolved by the exchange of wine. It is an assertion of good grace which does away with the mutual uncertainty.” Spacial proximity becomes social life through an exchange of gifts. Further, the pouring of the wine sanctions another exchange—conversation—and a whole series of trivial social ties unfolds. — Lewis Hyde, The Gift

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